Yunus partner

Yunus Emre - TV show about the making of a Sufi "mystic"

2020.11.30 23:48 bombadil1564 Yunus Emre - TV show about the making of a Sufi "mystic"

I'm not sure if the Sufi's have ever called themselves "mystics" or not, but for simplicity sake, I suppose you could say this is a story of one:
Yunus Emre - The Path of Love is a Turkish TV series circa 2015 about the true story of a Sufi walker from around 1200 C.E. It's on Netflix. The audio is Turkish and has English, Turkish, Hebrew and Thai subtitles.
My partner and I have just started watching this show. It's mesmerizing. I've never seen monastic life depicted on television in such a light. I know these are "just actors" playing the parts, but they do it so well. The teachings feel genuine, though I'm no scholar on them. There's some drama for sure (which I don't know if it's based upon the real history or if it was added for "dramatic flair"), but still, the reason and purpose for the drama seems worthwhile.
The only other TV show that I've seen that I think can elicit the same depth of heart for me is the current show on NBC, This is Us. It's a completely different show from Yunus Emre in the details, but the messages of the heart are similar. This is Us is secular, Yunus is fairly religious. Both speaking similar themes, through different perspectives, different cultures and times.
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2020.10.22 18:50 miyazakipls A round-up of our loaned players so far (except Jimmy)

I've been trying to watch the players we have out on loan in the 1.Lig lately (2.Lig is never on TV so I can't watch those), and though it's still early days, here's what I think of them, starting from best to worst of what I've seen, then the rest.
Berk Balaban - Ankaraspor: One of FOUR different GKs to have featured for Ankaraspor this season (one getting injured in the first day of the season, the other two being dropped) Berk has started to get some minutes for the team, having been given his first chance in a 1-1 draw hosting Giresunspor, and again today losing 2-0 to Tuzlaspor, making 5 saves (3 inside the box) and picking up a 7 rating on Sofascore.
From these two games you can see that Berk is pretty good at using his body to stop shots, as well as being competent enough at positioning compared to his older yerli teammates back home, but he could definitely improve his long balls to teammates and try to catch the ball more, rather than playing volleyball with the opposition. Hopefully he does enough to stay first choice and comes back to us miles ahead of Fatih and Okan.
Here are the highlights to his game today
Gökay Güney - Bandırmaspor: Gökay has only played one game so far and that was a 1-1 draw against Eskişehirspor, one of the weakest teams in the 1.Lig. Having said that he wasn't bad, having gotten a 7 alongside his CB partner Mehmet Yiğit; Mehmet focused a lot more on tackling and defending in that game, while our guy Gökay was a more ball-playing stoper- 79/89 accurate passes and a further 7/11 long balls is pretty good. EsEs had scored a penalty in this game and Gökay was completely unrelated to it, so despite being cut out in the defeat at Keçiörengücü, I'm hopeful that he can find more chances and come back in top condition.
If you can stand the horrible frame rate, highlights are here
Atalay Babacan - Adanaspor: I've been wanting to see Atalay play senior games for a while now, so I shouldn't complain. Anyway, Atalay has come off the bench in the last two games for Adana- the first in a 5-2 drubbing of Altınordu where he picked up an okay 6.8 (though he played a big part in their last goal, it didn't count as an assist) and secondly in a 4-3 loss to Giresunspor, getting a 6.7.
Atalay played with a lot of energy and made a lot of tackles in the time that he had, but what surprised me the most was how proficient he was at winning the ball, winning 6/7 ground duels across both games. Giresun proved to be the tougher of the two teams, as Atalay lost the ball 5 times in one half against them, so there's still a lot to learn for him- but there's also no doubting the talent's there, and for a little guy he's good at getting the ball; at this point it's up to FT as to whether he's good enough to break the infamous no Turks under 25 rule.
Here's the first game- Atalay's goal contribution is at 2:35
Yunus Akgün - Adana Demirspor: The biggest potential, but not living up to it so far. Like Atalay, Yunus has only taken part in two games. Unlike Atalay, he hasn't been as consistent. Yunus was decent in 45 minutes in the 1-0 loss to Altay, getting 6.9 with a decent shot from afar and a big chance created, but he also lost the ball 11 times in half a match. In the 15 minutes he had winning 4-2 against Ümraniyespor however, he got a 6.4, having lost possession 4 times- at least twice due to unforced errors. I choose to believe he just had a bad day here but either way, Yunus needs to pick up and become more consistent quickly if he wants a future with us, especially when FT is the manager and will be more than happy to play a geriatric in his position instead.
This is him at Altay- skip ahead to 1:40 for the second half and his fine effort
Abdussamed Karnuçu - Tarsus Idman Yurdu: After enjoying Ali Yavuz Kol for a season, TIY have decided to take on Abdussamed, having come back from a very long injury that threatened to end his career before it even began. I haven't seen him play, but playing 4 games out of 6 and even scoring in one of them is not bad.
Ercan Şirin - Serik Beylediyespor: The U19s legend himself, Ercan "hattrick against Fener" Şirin has feautred in Serik's last two games and kept a clean sheet in both of them, the latter being against leaders Turgutluspor, who had won all of their other games. I personally want to see him become good enough just for his feat at the U19 level, and from what online stats show, it's looking good.
Ferhan Evren - Afyonspor: Ferhan's played three games so far, having started all but one of these. No goals, but anywhere between 0-2 assists (Transfermarkt don't have assists for 2.Lig, it seems).
Ramazan Emirhan Civelek - Sakaryaspor: Hasn't played a single minute, sat on the bench thrice, looks like he won't be with us for long.
Erkan Süer and Süleyman Luş - Şanlıurfaspor: Haven't had the chance to feature yet but likely to soon as Şanlıurfa are by far the worst team in the 2.Lig with 1 point in six games and a GD of -21, so let's see what the future holds.
Tl;dr: Berk Balaban is a starter for now, Gökay played once and played well, Atalay/Yunus are top 5 bench players for their respective teams, Tarsus Idman Yurdu should become our official feeder club, and a second person called Ramazan Civelek is set to flop at an Istanbul team.
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2020.10.22 04:03 Minimum_Zucchini Final verses of Sunah Yunus are very important to reflect upon

Assalamu Alaikum, to the Muslims and non-Muslims in this subreddit.
I was just reading Surah Yunus (Chapter 10) and the final verses are directed towards all humanity as a reminder, but its a useful reminder for Muslims as well. Please take some time to reflect on this. I feel like these verses also clearly answer an often asked question which is "why Islam vs 1000 other religions".
Say, ˹O Prophet,˺ “O humanity! If you are in doubt of my faith, then ˹know that˺ I do not worship those ˹idols˺ you worship instead of Allah. But I worship Allah, Who has the power to cause your death. And I have been commanded, ‘Be one of the believers,’ and, ‘Be steadfast in faith in all uprightness, and do not be one of the polytheists,’ and ‘Do not invoke, instead of Allah, what can neither benefit nor harm you—for if you do, then you will certainly be one of the wrongdoers,’ and ‘If Allah touches you with harm, none can undo it except Him. And if He intends good for you, none can withhold His bounty. He grants it to whoever He wills of His servants. And He is the All-Forgiving, Most Merciful.’” Say, ˹O Prophet,˺ “O humanity! The truth has surely come to you from your Lord. So whoever chooses to be guided, it is only for their own good. And whoever chooses to stray, it is only to their own loss. And I am not a keeper over you.” And follow what is revealed to you, and be patient until Allah passes His judgment. For He is the Best of Judges. [Verses 104 - 109]
Allah is The God, The Creator, The Originator, The Sustainer. Allah is the one who brought us to life and brought all creation into existence. He is the One and Only, The Truth, The First, and The Last. The One without any partners.
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2020.08.15 16:39 riseofinsurtech Bottom of Pyramid Microinsurance: Hungry for Innovation

Bottom of Pyramid Microinsurance: Hungry for Innovation

Credit: www.theguardian.com
A large majority of poor in developing nations work in informal sectors, with no access to insurance. They cannot afford to buy insurance nor can they access social protection (in health, disability or unemployment cover) provided by employers or co-financed by governments. Across socioeconomic clusters, this group is most vulnerable to financial shocks, and unsurprisingly least protected.
Microinsurance offers solutions to fill these gaps and deliver insurance that is affordable to match the needs of the poor. It protects them against specific risks in exchange for regular premium payments as per insurance principles. The risks commonly encompass illness, accidental injury, death and property or crop loss. Started off as community based and mutual insurance schemes, these are now increasingly offered by traditional insurance.
A number of players form part of the microinsurance supply chain. Ranging from insurance regulators to carriers, administrators, it comprises delivery channels, technology platform and service providers (such as health facilities or funeral organizations).

https://preview.redd.it/aqnyq503c6h51.png?width=667&format=png&auto=webp&s=27cdbcc2f139ed1e575efdfe22348117a6a75cdc
The opportunity for micro-insurance varies from region to region. The potential market has been estimated to be 3-4 billion policies generating $30 - $50 billion in annual revenue.
The popularity of products is also region dependent, basis the risks which affect the region the most - such as earthquakes in Chile or drought in Kenya. Microinsurers have been most successful in APAC, where two-thirds of the poor are to be found. India and Bangladesh are fastest growing, followed by China and Philippines. The countries in the right side of the below chart have favorable regulatory and business environment, both being vital enabling factors.
https://preview.redd.it/nbsdomamc6h51.png?width=804&format=png&auto=webp&s=3ae94962e03bb410c44ce6e298af414e73bda4c7
Microinsurance does not have any single definition as such. In South Africa, for instance, it is considered as a max benefit of R50k per insured life, while in Philippines, its the amount of premium that's less than10 percent of current daily minimum wage rate for non-agri workers.
Differences from traditional insurance are:
  • Presumes low awareness of insurance as a concept.
  • Assumes poorly educated customers, so communication must be straightforward.
  • Executed as conveniently and simply as possible, including eligiblity requirements, exclusions, payments anc and claims.
  • Relies on group pricing, due to lack of personal data
  • Links premiums to other payments, such as loan repayments.
History of Microinsurance
Microinsurance is likened to be an outgrowth of microfinancing projects developed by Bangladeshi Nobel Prize-winning economist Muhammad Yunus, that helped millions of low-income individuals set up businesses, buy houses.
American International Group Inc. (AIG) was one of the first carriers to offer microinsurance and sell policies in Uganda in 1997. It was soon joined by other large insurers including Swiss Re, Munich Re, Allianz and Zurich Financial Services. Today many innovative microinsurance products have been developed to protect the working poor against the financial impact of losses.
The growth of microinsurance
Despite almost 2 decades of focus on the under and uninsured, microinsurance is estimated to reach just under 300 million people across the developing world, ~10% of the potential market.
Partnership is one of the pillars of an effective microinsurance business model, but it is not an easy endeavour. Partners rarely have identical priorities and work with competing constraints which need to be overcome for a successul model.
Four business models prevalent as distribution channels are a)partner agent model provider driven model c)charitable insurance model d)mutual/cooperative insurance model
The partner-agent is the most common and includes MFIs, NGOs, cooperatives and retailers. It piggybacks on the partners infrastructure and trust, thus helping reduce costs and speeden time to market, facilitating scale. For this model to succeed, partner's staff need to be educated in insurance. Since the partner owns the client interface, the partnership requires intensive management. A good example is Hollard in South Africa that sells inexpensive funeral insurance through budget clothing retail chain Pep Stores.
The below chart of distribution mix in four growing microinsurance markets shows finance institutions are among most favorable distribution partners, particularly for MFI partners in India, Indonesia and Philippines. Agents and brokers are also a popular distribution network for microinsurance, followed by retail and commercial networks.
https://preview.redd.it/ac53kyd6f6h51.png?width=756&format=png&auto=webp&s=1d2ad3367805f7d38a07700be26982715a18bd7c
A key challenge facing microinsurers are availability of products designed to meet customer needs while meeting the carrier's operational and cost requirements. While simpler products are easier to market and administer, they also provide limited benefits. Trade-offs are inevitable and innovation is invaluable.
The below figure highlights the prevalence of credit life and life products, understandable as partnership with microfinance institutions is commonly a distribution medium. The high proportion of life insurance signifies the relative simplicity to develop this product. For the market to evolve, however, there is a need to move towards more complex products such as health and agricultural insurance.
https://preview.redd.it/eg6m2sgne6h51.png?width=784&format=png&auto=webp&s=eb12edaac6a6282a0bb30c79b0ad24eff8d7f54a
Challenges And Need For Innovation
When it comes to microinsurance, innovation is more than a response to customer demand for more convenient service - it is usually an operational imperative. Insurers leverage technology with the aim of offering simple, affordable products to mostly illiterate customers in locations difficult to reach.
We look below at few examples of carriers and their innovations that helped them overcome challenges.
Easy availability of mobile technology has been a major enabling factor in most markets. UAP Insurance in Kenya enables farmers to buy crop insurance by using their mobile phone to send in a photograph of the barcode on a bag of fertilizer or seed, and to pay premiums using M-Pesa mobile banking system.
Similarly, real-time connectivity with the carriers' system is an important factor to enable bulk processing and servicing of low-premium policies with minimal user invovlement and at lowest cost. An exmple is IFMR Trust Holdings that works with HDFC Ergo GIC in India to use radio-frequency identification tags on insured cattle to minimize claims fraud.
Pay-as-you-go insurance platforms that use cloud technology are a necessary means to achieve an adaptable and extendable microinsurance operating model. Max New York Life in India has extended their virtual network by distributing scratch cards through small retailers. Customers pay premiums by buying a card and texting the concealed code to the insurer.
Despite the strides being made by carriers, the operational challenges that continue to derail the best of efforts include:
  • Lack of information on consumers
  • Consumers beyond current reach
  • Different and new consumer needs
  • Consumers inexperienced with formal financial services
  • Constrained business models
Adoption of sophisticated technology can have a powerful impact, but managing the significant inhibitors effectively is undoubtedly imperative to succeed in this market.
Among common innovative solutions driven by insurers are index-based insurance, grants from governments and/or donors to develop infrastructure, partnering with weather stations to collect meteorological data, risk-spreading to multinational insurers and reinsurers, and technology to manage fraud.
Additionally, new technology enabled partnerships increase the distribution reach of insurance. Peer to peer insurance enables new operational models and product categories. Demand based insurance charges premium per use. Alternative and digital data allow for improved customer knowledge. For example, online consumer retail purchase history can better inform about a potential consumer's risk profile and premium pricing.
Leveraging digital infrastructure reduces marginal cost of insurance delivery. e.g. Saldo in Mexico uses blockchain to verify transactions to reduce fraud. Afrisure in Zimbabwe uses satellite data to enable provision of agricultural insurance at scale.
Sustainable Profitability
Profitability has not been easy to achieve in microinsurance, being a sophisticated offering to most consumers, who mistrust it and cannot easily understand. It is also an emerging area for insurers, who have limited knowledge to underwrite accurately. Over time, these are expected to smoothen out, insurers will learn from early mistakes and build more efficient distribution channels.
The key to profitability might just lie in the business model. In order to be profitable, a low margin/high volume philosophy will be the preferred path. Microinsurers will have a compelling need to price products accurately with low margins, and then sell large volumes. The challenges will manifest in that voluntary insurance products sold on an individual basis will be more expensive to distribute and service than mandatory group polices linked to loans. Nevertheless, as carriers manage to maintain growth in revenue greater than growth in incremental costs, they will derive profitability through scale.
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2020.04.18 16:55 Faisalero Corona virus is of the lesser torment short of the greater torment, that perhaps they may repent

Imam Nasser Mohammad Al-Yemeni
10 - Rajab - 1441 AH 05 - 03 - 2020 AD 12:51 pm (According to the official time of [Mecca] mother of towns) ________
Corona virus is of the lesser torment short of the greater torment, that perhaps they may repent In the name of Allah, the most Gracious, the most Merciful, Allah's prayers of forgiveness be upon his prophets and his loyal servants, in every time and place, and there will be no fear concerning them, nor will they grieve
Indeed, so often we gave advice the decision makers; especially the leaders of Muslims and general advice to non-Muslim leaders, but they do not like advisors. Anyway, the deniers disbelieved in the word of Allah, whether they are atheists, those who associate partners with Allah, or Muslims, except him upon whom my Lord has mercy, and earned good in his faith. Indeed, I leave you to Allah, the One, the Almighty, who chooses me as His Caliph over the world to manifest me over you by His power and strength فَذَرْنِي وَمَن يُكَذِّبُ بِهَٰذَا الْحَدِيثِ ۖ سَنَسْتَدْرِجُهُم مِّنْ حَيْثُ لَا يَعْلَمُونَ ﴿٤٤﴾ وَأُمْلِي لَهُمْ ۚ إِنَّ كَيْدِي مَتِينٌ صدق الله العظيم [القلم 44-45 ] So leave Me (to deal) with him who denies this discourse . We will progressively lead them from where they do not know, (44) for, behold, though I may give them rein for a while, indeed, My plan is firm [Surah: 68 - Al-Qalam – Verses: 44-45]
And here Allah is challenging you with one of His smallest soldiers that cannot be seen by the naked eye. He shook the major and minor countries of the world a severe shaking despite it being a mere virus for humans that you do not have encompassing knowledge about whereby Allah Has invaded you with it, by which Allah is challenging the entirety of medical scientists. Indeed, they will never find a vaccine for it as they claim, so whatever they announce, do not be deceived. I swear by Allah that they are liars, even if they backed each other up with help and support, despite the virus being just a tiny living creature of the unseen soldiers of Allah. They will never be able to do that, by the permission of Allah, just so that you may know that you will not encompass anything of His knowledge except for what He wills, praise be to Him
But you people are deviators, and you will see the plotting of the soldiers of Allah; the Corona virus that suffocates, that which you had not taken into account. And Allah will progressively lead people with its secretive and smart way of infecting to reach whom Allah wills among their masters and eminent ones from where they do not know. and I see the World Health Organisation do not consider it as a pandemic yet as they claim they will control it, indeed they are liars, as how can they control the torment of Allah? But I, the Imam Mahdi Nasser Muhammad Al-yamani, Caliph of Allah over the world, give you a ruling with truth that it is not only a pandemic, but a global torment Since it is a kind of a lesser torment short of the greater torment so that you may repent, definitely the death rate is low at first, but the cases now are in millions, and so many people do not know yet that they are infected, and this is a plot of God so that they inflict other people who think themselves to be secure from the torment of Allah that suffocates the respiratory system. Their chests will be tight and constricted as though they were ascending upwards into the sky until they suffocate because of the conjunction of the respiratory system and its duct So how would Allah not afflict the arrogant ones who are the most worthy of it? Those who turn away from the remembrance of their Lord, so that they may repent. And God destroys whoever He wants among them to be an admonition for the world in order to return to their Lord by humble supplication and prayers to remove His torment promising Him to follow His Book, the Holy Qur'an, asking Him for strength as He intervenes between a man and his heart, as they hope Allah to strengthen their hearts to keep their promise to God in order to keep them away from the torment, so that Allah removes the torment from them so that they follow His Book, the Holy Qur'an, and to be rightly guided I want to conclude my clarification with the Call from Allah in the Holy Qur'an during the afmonition of His torment about the illness within the chest, as it is an admonition of torment for those who fear God. In line with the verse يَا أَيُّهَا النَّاسُ قَدْ جَاءَتْكُم مَّوْعِظَةٌ مِّن رَّبِّكُمْ وَشِفَاءٌ لِّمَا فِي الصُّدُورِ وَهُدًى وَرَحْمَةٌ لِّلْمُؤْمِنِينَ صدق الله العظيم [يونس57] O mankind, there has come to you admonition from your Lord and a cure for what is in the chests and guidance and mercy for the believers [Surah: 10 - Yunus - Verse: 57]
And I know it is a torment, suffering, and a great horror for many peoples that they may repent and worship Allah alone no partners with Him, and repent from the great sins; injustice and immorality; the apparent and concealed of it, privately and publicly, also to perform ablution perfectly to worship Allah alone no partners with Him, and do not invoke anyone but Allah
Know you that it is a global torment, with hidden plotting from Allah, the One, the Almighty, and not just a pandemic as you are claiming, you will definitely know that. So flee from Allah to Him, I am just a clear warner. And do not close mosques, the Houses of Allah, in the face of those who take refuge in Him wanting to establish prayers to their Lord alone no partners with Him. Indeed, Mosques are for Allah, so do not invoke anyone with Him. Indeed, whoever enters Allah's Houses to worship Him will be secure from the suffocating virus even if there are infected people taking refuge in Him with them, the righteous person praying will not be infected, as they are believers and rely upon their Lord, so, rely on Him if you are believers
Know you that the Corona virus is a new torment of great might, that causes those whom Allah wants to be out of breath little by little, and those who are cured should know it is not because of medication but because of their invocation to God, the Most Merciful. Thus, scientists will never find a cure for the torment of Allah, as it is not a trial from Allah to test what is in your hearts, nay, it is a torment that attacks those who Allah wills to be infected amongst those who turn away among you that they may return. Among you are those who will die of the suffocating torment called "Corona - virus" and it is but of the lesser torment short of the greater one that perhaps they may repent and supplicate humbly to their Lord in order for Him to remove the severe torment from them in order to follow the Book of truth from their Lord, the Holy Qur'an
The torment shall not be removed from those who prostrate to what is called " Al - Hussein Dust"! ( In Shi'a ), as Allah has not sent down any authority of that in the Holy Qur'an nor in the true teachings (of the prophet) that came from their Lord. In fact, they innovated it themselves. And it shall also not be removed from those who invoke those in the graves to remove the torment, as the latter do not hear the supplication, and even if they were to hear they would not answer them, and on the Day of Resurrection, will reject them for their associating them (with God) and will be against them. Indeed, I warned and advised you not to invoke anyone with Allah, but Alas! Most of them believe not in Allah except while they associate others with Him
Furthermore, I warn the wrong doers in general; the eminent ones and those who follow them whether in Muslim or non-Muslim countries of the lesser torment of Allah, and of other signs of torment until the greater torment overshadows the oppressing people, within the land, who wronged their peoples without any right and increased the corruption. Indeed, your Lord is ever watchful
In addition, I warn them from the torment of the planetoid of torment that will cause quakes behind the western Atlantic in the United States of America, thus, it will stir up clouds of dust from their land causing the atmosphere to be full of dust, a striking wave will spread widely in the whole world. And you will know that we are truthful by the permission of Allah, Lord of the world. After that, there will come the planet "Saqar" in case the torment planetoid was not enough of a reminder for you, so fear Allah O you of understanding
The promised great corruption has come to the blessed Mosque; Al-Aqsa; the first of the two Qiblas (prayer direction). Indeed, the sacredness of Al-Aqsa mosque for Allah is the same as the sacredness of the Sacred Mosque, O you who undersold the glorified house of Allah. Certainly, you will never find any protector nor defender from Allah or from His torment, and you will lose this life and the hereafter, and it is the greatest loss, I am but a clear adviser
Death has come to you while you are turning away in heedlessness O Allah, I have delivered, so be my witness
Peace be upon the messengers, praise to Allah, Lord of the world Caliph and Servant of Allah; Imam Mahdi Nasser Muhammad Al-yamani
source http://www.bushra-islamia.com/showthread.php?39469
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2020.03.25 17:44 Quranic_Islam Shirk - Some considerations

Assalaamu alaykum all

I thought I would share some thought regarding the issue of shirk as quite a few recent posts I think show that many have adopted the traditional/inherited view. It is a view which has become even more narrowly focused as the Salafi/Wahhabi doctrine was spread far and wide over the last century, long before most of us were born. It is that the Qur'an's primarily goal and the primary mission of the Messengers was against wood and stone idols, to "fight the statues" for God's sake ... as if that is even a fight, or as if God is threatened by them. As if these inanimate objects were some great evil. And with the Salafi/Wahhabi sweep, the "everything is shirk" vibe was spread, and an almost superstitious fear of shirk developed. Superstitious because it wasn't based on knowledge, and certainly wasn't based on the Qur'an. Some became afraid of even touching an idol, as if that is somehow damaging to faith.
The whole atmosphere was a misdirection. They found shirk where it wasn't and often missed it where it was. Even prayer beads were called shirk for a while, remember that?
Most Quranists have seen them throw the accusations of shirk everywhere, perhaps some used to do it themselves. And old habits can die hard. Or perhaps some are still convinced by those views. Either way it seems some have adopted it into the their Quranist mentality.

But has the necessary re-evaluation with the Qur'an been done? Or has this just been brought forwards?

Yes, some seem to have understood that people can be idols. But that's where it stops. This is then just used as quick-fire tool to talk about mainstream/inherited Islam: "they worship Muhammad!" ... "they worship Bukhari!" ... "they worship Shafi'i"
At the same time the superstitious hatred/fear of physical idols is still a widespread view. This view is all around the themes that people absorb when they start to learn Islam ... like that God hates the idols, hates the idol worshipers, and that He sent revelations and Messengers to take people aware from the falsehood of idol worship and towards the worship of the One True God, and so as to "remove all barriers between man and God so that we can call on Him directly" ... which is true, but it is so far from the full picture, and not the purpose given in the Qur'an. And so another tool can be used: "they worship the black stone" ... "they worship zamzam water" ... "they worship X, Y or Z"

That was a little intro.

But really the take away from this post are some features in some verses that I think need to be thought and about and considered calmly for those who want get to grips with what shirk is, what it isn't, and what exactly are we supposed to avoid.

1.
The phrase/clause "what He has sent down no authority concerning" - ما لم ينزل به سلطاناً
See Aal 'Imran (3) v.151, Al-An'am (6) v.81, Al'A'raaf (7) v.33, al-Hajj (22) v.71
Here it is in 7:33

قُلْ إِنَّمَا حَرَّمَ رَبِّىَ ٱلْفَوَٰحِشَ مَا ظَهَرَ مِنْهَا وَمَا بَطَنَ وَٱلْإِثْمَ وَٱلْبَغْىَ بِغَيْرِ ٱلْحَقِّ وَأَن تُشْرِكُوا۟ بِٱللَّهِ مَا لَمْ يُنَزِّلْ بِهِۦ سُلْطَٰنًا وَأَن تَقُولُوا۟ عَلَى ٱللَّهِ مَا لَا تَعْلَمُونَ

"My Lord has only forbidden immoralities - what is apparent of them and what is concealed - and sin, and oppression without right, and that you associate with Allah THAT FOR WHICH HE HAS SENT DOWN NO AUTHORITY, and that you say about Allah that which you do not know"
This is a phrase that needs to be considered and accepted. That the prohibition of "shirk" isn't a blanket prohibition ... as shocking as that may seem to many Muslims now. It is in fact conditional. Because that for which God has sent down authority must be given differential treatment to the extent of that given authority. Does that mean ascribing Divinity? Of course not. It means authority is God's to give to whomever or whatever He pleases. This clause needs to be understood. And of course those of you who know the Qur'an should now have certain other verses ringing in your ears ... verses about how God has given سلطان to certain individuals.

2.
Al-Zukhruf (43) v.81

قُلْ إِن كَانَ لِلرَّحْمَٰنِ وَلَدٌ فَأَنَا۠ أَوَّلُ ٱلْعَٰبِدِينَ

"Say: If the All-Merciful did have a son, the I would be the first to worship (him)"
This is something that the majority of Muslims would consider shirk and would think it inconceivable, especially in the light of all the arguments they have against Christians. But really, this is what we should say, to ourselves first before we even say it to them. The Prophet Muhammad said it, and I certainly second it: if God had a son, I would worship him. Yes I know the impossibility of God having an "uncreated son" ... but yes He can have a created one, as He says in the Qur'an. Then how many of those who rave about shirk would follow the path of Shaytan? Turn their noses up and refuse to bow down? How many do so now to those whom God has given authority.
This verse isn't even God commanding him to something. This is God commanding the Messenger to tell others just what the state of affairs is. How it should be.

3.
An examples of the type of "mushrikeen and their idols" that is overwhelmingly condemned in the Qur'an
Yunus (10) v. 28 - 35

وَيَوْمَ نَحْشُرُهُمْ جَمِيعًا ثُمَّ نَقُولُ لِلَّذِينَ أَشْرَكُوا۟ مَكَانَكُمْ أَنتُمْ وَشُرَكَآؤُكُمْ فَزَيَّلْنَا بَيْنَهُمْ وَقَالَ شُرَكَآؤُهُم مَّا كُنتُمْ إِيَّانَا تَعْبُدُونَ ﴿٢٨﴾ فَكَفَىٰ بِٱللَّهِ شَهِيدًۢا بَيْنَنَا وَبَيْنَكُمْ إِن كُنَّا عَنْ عِبَادَتِكُمْ لَغَٰفِلِينَ ﴿٢٩﴾ هُنَالِكَ تَبْلُوا۟ كُلُّ نَفْسٍ مَّآ أَسْلَفَتْ وَرُدُّوٓا۟ إِلَى ٱللَّهِ مَوْلَىٰهُمُ ٱلْحَقِّ وَضَلَّ عَنْهُم مَّا كَانُوا۟ يَفْتَرُونَ ﴿٣٠﴾ قُلْ مَن يَرْزُقُكُم مِّنَ ٱلسَّمَآءِ وَٱلْأَرْضِ أَمَّن يَمْلِكُ ٱلسَّمْعَ وَٱلْأَبْصَٰرَ وَمَن يُخْرِجُ ٱلْحَىَّ مِنَ ٱلْمَيِّتِ وَيُخْرِجُ ٱلْمَيِّتَ مِنَ ٱلْحَىِّ وَمَن يُدَبِّرُ ٱلْأَمْرَ فَسَيَقُولُونَ ٱللَّهُ فَقُلْ أَفَلَا تَتَّقُونَ ﴿٣١﴾ فَذَٰلِكُمُ ٱللَّهُ رَبُّكُمُ ٱلْحَقُّ فَمَاذَا بَعْدَ ٱلْحَقِّ إِلَّا ٱلضَّلَٰلُ فَأَنَّىٰ تُصْرَفُونَ ﴿٣٢﴾ كَذَٰلِكَ حَقَّتْ كَلِمَتُ رَبِّكَ عَلَى ٱلَّذِينَ فَسَقُوٓا۟ أَنَّهُمْ لَا يُؤْمِنُونَ ﴿٣٣﴾ قُلْ هَلْ مِن شُرَكَآئِكُم مَّن يَبْدَؤُا۟ ٱلْخَلْقَ ثُمَّ يُعِيدُهُۥ قُلِ ٱللَّهُ يَبْدَؤُا۟ ٱلْخَلْقَ ثُمَّ يُعِيدُهُۥ فَأَنَّىٰ تُؤْفَكُونَ ﴿٣٤﴾ قُلْ هَلْ مِن شُرَكَآئِكُم مَّن يَهْدِىٓ إِلَى ٱلْحَقِّ قُلِ ٱللَّهُ يَهْدِى لِلْحَقِّ أَفَمَن يَهْدِىٓ إِلَى ٱلْحَقِّ أَحَقُّ أَن يُتَّبَعَ أَمَّن لَّا يَهِدِّىٓ إِلَّآ أَن يُهْدَىٰ فَمَا لَكُمْ كَيْفَ تَحْكُمُونَ ﴿٣٥﴾

[10:28] And [mention, O Muhammad], the Day We will gather them all together - then We will say to those who associated others with Allah, "[Remain in] your place, you and your 'PARTNERS/IDOLS.' " Then We will separate them, and their "PARTNERS" WILL SAY, "You did not used to worship us, [10:29] And sufficient is Allah as a witness between us and you that we were of your worship unaware." [10:30] There, [on that Day], every soul will be put to trial for what it did previously, and they will be returned to Allah, their master, the Truth, and lost from them is whatever they used to invent. [10:31] Say, "Who provides for you from the heaven and the earth? Or who controls hearing and sight and who brings the living out of the dead and brings the dead out of the living and who arranges [every] matter?" They will say, "Allah," so say, "Then will you not fear Him?" [10:32] For that is Allah, your Lord, the Truth. And what can be beyond truth except error? So how are you averted? [10:33] Thus the word of your Lord has come into effect upon those who are corrupted - that they will not believe. [10:34] Say, "Are there of your '_PARTNERS_' any who begins creation and then repeats it?" Say, "Allah begins creation and then repeats it, so how are you deluded?" [10:35] Say, "Are there of your 'PARTNERS' any who guides to the truth?" Say, "Allah guides to the truth. So is He who guides to the truth more worthy to be followed or he who guides not unless he is guided? Then what is [wrong] with you - how do you judge?"

Look at the text all together. Do these partners sound like stone and wooden idols, or people? Do you think the rhetorical questions in v.34-35 are being asked about stone/wooden idols, or the same people from the beginning? And a key component is that this all revolves around v.33 ... the corrupted, wicked people. For that is what real shirk does, what it leads to, and why it is haram ... mere physical idol worship does not.
It is obvious. And there are many verses like this
Another example is the passage Al-An'am (6): v.136 - 140
I'll only put v.137 for brevity:

وَكَذَٰلِكَ زَيَّنَ لِكَثِيرٍ مِّنَ ٱلْمُشْرِكِينَ قَتْلَ أَوْلَٰدِهِمْ شُرَكَآؤُهُمْ لِيُرْدُوهُمْ وَلِيَلْبِسُوا۟ عَلَيْهِمْ دِينَهُمْ وَلَوْ شَآءَ ٱللَّهُ مَا فَعَلُوهُ فَذَرْهُمْ وَمَا يَفْتَرُونَ ﴿١٣٧﴾

[6:137] And likewise, to many of the polytheists their partners have made [to seem] pleasing the killing of their children, taking them to their destruction and to cover them with confusion (or "to dress them") in their religion. And if Allah had willed, they would not have done so. So leave them and that which they invent.
Idols are inert. They do not "encourage/make pleasing" the killing of children, they do not take/lead anyone to destruction, they don't try to dress up others with inventions in religion. They don't "invent". Period.
These are people.

Now it may seem like I've given two contradictory ideas. One that shirk is mainly about people, and the other that their are people who do need to be deferred to. But these are not contradictory notions. To obey someone, anyone, in what God has commanded is not shirk. No matter how much servitude is shown. Because it is in line with what God has commanded. And this is an imperative when that person has been given authority. But to obey, follow and have a sense of servitude to those who command to falsehoods, those who invent lies and forge religions ... that is the pivotal shirk mentioned in the Qur'an, the most dangerous sort.

Not the inanimate objects. They hardly matter at all.

And the commands and prohibitions against shirk are not an excuse for arrogance or belligerence against those whom God has placed above you and given authority.

Though I wonder if the way some express their attitude to Muhammad is more of one of two types of hypocrisy;
  1. Either self hypocrisy/dishonesty with themselves before even to others. So they say now and here, while he is not with us, that he is basically just "a messenger boy, a delivery guy". Yet if he was alive now they certainly wouldn't treat him as "just" that. Rather they would treat him as he should really be treated.
  2. Actual hypocrisy like those mentioned in the Qur'an who would, for example turn their noses up and their backs at Muhammad when others tell them to ask him to seek forgiveness for them. No, they'd rather "ask God directly". What? Even if God wants you to gain forgiveness through him?

Sorry if it seemed rushed. Tried to keep it brief
submitted by Quranic_Islam to Quraniyoon [link] [comments]


2019.06.22 23:42 Sortimento Vancouver Fashion Week FW19 : desfile Novita Yunus para Indonesian Textile Heritage

Vancouver Fashion Week FW19 : desfile Novita Yunus para Indonesian Textile Heritage
Vancouver Fashion Week FW19 : desfile Novita Yunus para Indonesian Textile Heritage


https://preview.redd.it/tt8uvf3q9z531.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f3f1562cace3e40c95ba5fb6ee8614700eb74bd3
https://preview.redd.it/r8qx673q9z531.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3ae2052b76dcff160ffbaa2fbe7a10efcb95f5a8
https://preview.redd.it/up4buc3q9z531.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3052461f9fac881f7b045ae6623ba115fc339dff

O desfile do Consulado Geral da República da Indonésia com o tema “Indonesian Textile Heritage”, realizado na sexta-feira (22.03.19) no quinto dia da VFW – Vancouver Fashion Week, mostrou peças desenvolvidas por Novita Yunus e Bernarda. Na passarela, um espetáculo que expôs os ricos, diversos e belos tecidos encontrados em toda a Indonésia.
MAIS EM https://sortimentos.com.bvancouver-fashion-week-fw-56/
- - -
Os sites Sortimentos ( https://sortimentos.com.br ) e Moda Eventos ( https://modaeventos.com.br ) , de Fábio Juchen, são media partner da Vancouver Fashion Week por cinco temporadas consecutivas.
- - -
A próxima edição da VFW - Vancouver Fashion Week que apresentará os lançamentos para a Primavera / Verão ( spring / summer ) acontecerá de 7 a 13 de Outubro/19
- - -
#NovitaYunus #Indonesian #Textile #IndonesianTextileHeritage #VFW #VFWFW
#VancouverFashionWeek #Vancouver #FashionWeek #Fashion #Moda #DesfiledeModa #ModaInverno #Clothes #ModaFeminina #SemanadeModa #VFW #LooksdaModa #LookdaModa #Looks #clothing #BestLooks #estilista #estilistas #Newdesigners #designers #WomensClothing
submitted by Sortimento to Moda [link] [comments]


2019.06.21 20:46 Sortimento Vancouver Fashion Week FW19 : desfile Bernarda Antony para Indonesian Textile Heritage

Vancouver Fashion Week FW19 : desfile Bernarda Antony para Indonesian Textile Heritage

- - -
O desfile do Consulado Geral da República da Indonésia com o tema “Indonesian Textile Heritage”, realizado na sexta-feira (22.03.19) no quinto dia da VFW – Vancouver Fashion Week, mostrou peças desenvolvidas por Novita Yunus e Bernarda. Na passarela, um espetáculo que expôs os ricos, diversos e belos tecidos encontrados em toda a Indonésia.
MAIS EM https://sortimentos.com.bvancouver-fashion-week-fw-56/

https://preview.redd.it/lwx7mcvf9r531.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0bb101db018e08d5a9ef8f3b3342c8866edd24d5
https://preview.redd.it/9nl1l8vf9r531.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=cfc2e2f8c8c52a1c055740fb0e070b8bbe4598e8
- - -
Os sites Sortimentos ( https://sortimentos.com.br ) e Moda Eventos ( https://modaeventos.com.br ) , de Fábio Juchen, são media partner da Vancouver Fashion Week por cinco temporadas consecutivas.
- - -
A próxima edição da VFW - Vancouver Fashion Week que apresentará os lançamentos para a Primavera / Verão ( spring / summer ) acontecerá de 7 a 13 de Outubro/19
- - -
#Bernarda #BernardaAntony #Indonesian #Textile #IndonesianTextileHeritage #VFWFW #VFWFW19
#VancouverFashionWeek #Vancouver #FashionWeek #Fashion #Moda #DesfiledeModa #ModaInverno #Clothes #ModaFeminina #SemanadeModa #VFW #LooksdaModa #LookdaModa #Looks #clothing #BestLooks #estilista #estilistas #Newdesigners #designers #WomensClothing
submitted by Sortimento to Moda [link] [comments]


2019.04.09 02:29 earlydayrunnershigh a16z podcast: Fintech for Startups and Incumbents

Part 1: How might a startup come after an incumbent?

I want life insurance and I eat 5 donuts a day. I just had a donut today. I don't eat 5 donuts, but I have 1 donut every Friday as you can testify. And then I have a friend who goes to the gym 5 times a day, never eats a donut. That guy's probably going to live longer than me. Hopefully not, but probabilistically he's probably going to have a better time than I am, in terms of life expectancy. So why is it that we both pay the same rate and that just seems unfair to him. It seems great to me, because he's subsidizing me, and that seems unfair and then the startups can sometimes exploit that psychological unfairness
So what they do is they say yeah. Can you run a 9 or an 8 minute mile? Can you do these things to prove that you're better than everybody else? And why is that important? Well from their own balance sheet or profitability perspective they want to get these good customers. Versus, you know, a brand new life insurance company that said, Hey, life insurance takes too long to get it's a big pain and it's expensive. We’ll underwrite you on the spot in one minute, no blood test, that's going to be adverse selection. That's like, ooh, I think I'm gonna die soon. Everybody rejected me for life insurance. I'm going to that company. As opposed to here, they're only getting the customers that kind of hit hit the underwriting standard, which is great. They think it's fair. So it's a differentiator from a brand perspective and then it turns out that again each marginal customer and insurance is kind of a coin flip. They're getting a weighted coin because they're only getting people on the far right side of this normal distribution.
What if you can use different data sources to, again, it's not positive versus adverse selection as in some of the insurance companies, but it's saying can I collect more forms of data so that instead of saying the only way that I can make my operation work is to charge an interest rate, which actually turns out to be illegal. Can I come up with more data sources that effectively even though discrimination sounds like a terrible word and it's certainly used in that construct. If you discriminate against criminals, that's fine. I mean some of the people that try to take advantage of lenders are actual like organized crime, you don't want them in your bin. You want to throw them out? How do you, how do you take more data sources and actually start measuring this?
(On how Earnin operates) Then you can tip us, there's no cost. If you want to pay us nothing, that's fine. I mean, we would appreciate if you pay us something because obviously we're providing a valuable service for you, and then you can even give tips for your friends. There's this community that's really emerged of people on Earnin and actually if you look back at different business models, but this idea of microfinance in general. So if you think about Muhammad Yunus and what he did. This idea of can you encourage people to pay back loans using social pressure?So again, not adverse selection versus positive selection, but actually trying to force everybody down positive behavior. Let's get the community to encourage repayment.

Part 2: As an existing player, what should I do to fend off startups?

(You’re in my seat, you're the head of innovation or head of strategy or head of digital at one of these big fintech companies. What should I do with respect to startups?) Well, I think it's actually very hard for a company that's trying to be all things to all customers because if you look at what SoFi is, look at SoFi’s brand. The brand is you know, we are the high like if you're great, you're good enough for us. If you're a HENRY (High Earnings, Not Rich Yet) you're good enough for us. Health IQ, if you're healthy, you're good enough for us. So on that sector of the curve, how does Geico say? Hey, if you're a good driver go to the special part of Geico. If you're a regular driver, you still say 15% if you're a bad driver and you had a DUI. Well, we can we can cover you over here. It's lost in this kind of giant Geico, you know gecko marketing message. So in many cases it actually helps to have sub brands and divide this up which is somewhat anathema to a lot of companies that want to say how do we get as much efficiency in synergy as possible. We're going to have one overarching brand.
Probably the easiest way that is often counterintuitive for a lot of big companies is what I call this "The turn down traffic strategy". So Chase turns down a lot of people for loans either because again, it's the the bin and ball problem where it's like well you might be good, you might be bad. Sometimes it's not even that. It's like we think you're good, but we just can't profitably underwrite a $400 loan. But Chase has all the traffic. So what is turned down traffic? It's saying okay, we rejected you but hey, here's a friend that you might like. So this is not cream of the crop. This is the bottom tier on the ingestion point for a big financial institution saying we don't want you which is kind of a mean thing to say. A way to ameliorate that potentially is saying we don't want you because we're not far enough yet, or sorry, we're working on it ,but here's a great startup that does.
(All right, just given those dynamics just wait for the later rounds. Let all the venture guys take all the risk and then like you plow in late. That should be my strategy.) I think in general that's probably a better strategy but again say like we're getting a great deal on this one. Then you know that you're the adverse selection source of capital as opposed to okay, here's something I can't believe we're paying this much money for it. We have to fight our way in there are 10 other people that wanted it. You probably know you're onto a good customer if you will or a good investment.
I think actually that does make sense. I mean there should be some kind of gating item to make sure like you not a (investing in like) 100, but how do we how do we stay close to different models that are working well, because the main advantage that the incumbents have, again depends on like lending or under or insurance, but it's typically something around cost of capital and something around distribution. So if you have both of those and you're not using it to the fullest extent like you turn down a lot of customers, like you should try to find an intelligent way of using this. Using something that's your unique thing. Like venture capital firms don't have that, I can't find somebody and send them a million customers tomorrow, but Geico could. So, but you can't do that a hundred times. You can probably do that some some sub-segment of times according to how much additional traffic or whatever it is that the unique advantage that you want to bring to bear.
I'm a big fan of what Facebook has done withM&A and I encourage everybody in pretty much every other industry to do this. So Facebook has two formats for M&A. One is we buy the existential threat that could kill us and we price it probabilistically. So surrender 1% of our market cap to buy Instagram. Yeah, it was way overpriced but everybody said that but there's a 1/100 chance that this is going to be bigger than Facebook. We should probably surrender one percent of our market cap. WhatsApp, 7% chance or whatever it was. That was 7% of Facebook’s fully diluted market cap was spent on WhatsApp. These were brilliant acquisitions. Oculus. I mean Oculus hasn't turned out the same with what WhatsApp has perhaps, but like same idea. It's like this could be the new platform. If we don't buy this and Apple does we are subject to their random whims and fancies. So that's that's Category 1. Category 2 and this is super counterintuitive for a lot of companies. Buy the guys that failed trying because, they had the courage and the tenacity to try to go and build something new. And that's what you want in your company as well. And then this is the most counterintuitive part is like take the person that failed and put them in charge of the person that was successful.
Visit here to listen directly to the cuts
submitted by earlydayrunnershigh to PodCut [link] [comments]


2019.04.09 01:44 earlydayrunnershigh An excellent podcast recently on a16z podcast: Fintech for Startups and Incumbents

I listened to an excellent podcast on fintech startups and existing incumbents recently by Alex Rampell (this guy is amazing by the way..) and Frank Chen over at a16z. Thought I share some of the quotes mentioned there, for folks who haven't listened to it yet.

Part 1: How might a startup come after an incumbent?

I want life insurance and I eat 5 donuts a day. I just had a donut today. I don't eat 5 donuts, but I have 1 donut every Friday as you can testify. And then I have a friend who goes to the gym 5 times a day, never eats a donut. That guy's probably going to live longer than me. Hopefully not, but probabilistically he's probably going to have a better time than I am, in terms of life expectancy. So why is it that we both pay the same rate and that just seems unfair to him. It seems great to me, because he's subsidizing me, and that seems unfair and then the startups can sometimes exploit that psychological unfairness

So what they do is they say yeah. Can you run a 9 or an 8 minute mile? Can you do these things to prove that you're better than everybody else? And why is that important? Well from their own balance sheet or profitability perspective they want to get these good customers. Versus, you know, a brand new life insurance company that said, Hey, life insurance takes too long to get it's a big pain and it's expensive. We’ll underwrite you on the spot in one minute, no blood test, that's going to be adverse selection. That's like, ooh, I think I'm gonna die soon. Everybody rejected me for life insurance. I'm going to that company. As opposed to here, they're only getting the customers that kind of hit hit the underwriting standard, which is great. They think it's fair. So it's a differentiator from a brand perspective and then it turns out that again each marginal customer and insurance is kind of a coin flip. They're getting a weighted coin because they're only getting people on the far right side of this normal distribution.

What if you can use different data sources to, again, it's not positive versus adverse selection as in some of the insurance companies, but it's saying can I collect more forms of data so that instead of saying the only way that I can make my operation work is to charge an interest rate, which actually turns out to be illegal. Can I come up with more data sources that effectively even though discrimination sounds like a terrible word and it's certainly used in that construct. If you discriminate against criminals, that's fine. I mean some of the people that try to take advantage of lenders are actual like organized crime, you don't want them in your bin. You want to throw them out? How do you, how do you take more data sources and actually start measuring this?

(On how Earnin operates) Then you can tip us, there's no cost. If you want to pay us nothing, that's fine. I mean, we would appreciate if you pay us something because obviously we're providing a valuable service for you, and then you can even give tips for your friends. There's this community that's really emerged of people on Earnin and actually if you look back at different business models, but this idea of microfinance in general. So if you think about Muhammad Yunus and what he did. This idea of can you encourage people to pay back loans using social pressure?So again, not adverse selection versus positive selection, but actually trying to force everybody down positive behavior. Let's get the community to encourage repayment.

Part 2: As an existing player, what should I do to fend off startups?

(You’re in my seat, you're the head of innovation or head of strategy or head of digital at one of these big fintech companies. What should I do with respect to startups?) Well, I think it's actually very hard for a company that's trying to be all things to all customers because if you look at what SoFi is, look at SoFi’s brand. The brand is you know, we are the high like if you're great, you're good enough for us. If you're a HENRY (High Earnings, Not Rich Yet) you're good enough for us. Health IQ, if you're healthy, you're good enough for us. So on that sector of the curve, how does Geico say? Hey, if you're a good driver go to the special part of Geico. If you're a regular driver, you still say 15% if you're a bad driver and you had a DUI. Well, we can we can cover you over here. It's lost in this kind of giant Geico, you know gecko marketing message. So in many cases it actually helps to have sub brands and divide this up which is somewhat anathema to a lot of companies that want to say how do we get as much efficiency in synergy as possible. We're going to have one overarching brand.

Probably the easiest way that is often counterintuitive for a lot of big companies is what I call this "The turn down traffic strategy". So Chase turns down a lot of people for loans either because again, it's the the bin and ball problem where it's like well you might be good, you might be bad. Sometimes it's not even that. It's like we think you're good, but we just can't profitably underwrite a $400 loan. But Chase has all the traffic. So what is turned down traffic? It's saying okay, we rejected you but hey, here's a friend that you might like. So this is not cream of the crop. This is the bottom tier on the ingestion point for a big financial institution saying we don't want you which is kind of a mean thing to say. A way to ameliorate that potentially is saying we don't want you because we're not far enough yet, or sorry, we're working on it ,but here's a great startup that does.

(All right, just given those dynamics just wait for the later rounds. Let all the venture guys take all the risk and then like you plow in late. That should be my strategy.) I think in general that's probably a better strategy but again say like we're getting a great deal on this one. Then you know that you're the adverse selection source of capital as opposed to okay, here's something I can't believe we're paying this much money for it. We have to fight our way in there are 10 other people that wanted it. You probably know you're onto a good customer if you will or a good investment.

I think actually that does make sense. I mean there should be some kind of gating item to make sure like you not a (investing in like) 100, but how do we how do we stay close to different models that are working well, because the main advantage that the incumbents have, again depends on like lending or under or insurance, but it's typically something around cost of capital and something around distribution. So if you have both of those and you're not using it to the fullest extent like you turn down a lot of customers, like you should try to find an intelligent way of using this. Using something that's your unique thing. Like venture capital firms don't have that, I can't find somebody and send them a million customers tomorrow, but Geico could. So, but you can't do that a hundred times. You can probably do that some some sub-segment of times according to how much additional traffic or whatever it is that the unique advantage that you want to bring to bear.

I'm a big fan of what Facebook has done withM&A and I encourage everybody in pretty much every other industry to do this. So Facebook has two formats for M&A. One is we buy the existential threat that could kill us and we price it probabilistically. So surrender 1% of our market cap to buy Instagram. Yeah, it was way overpriced but everybody said that but there's a 1/100 chance that this is going to be bigger than Facebook. We should probably surrender one percent of our market cap. WhatsApp, 7% chance or whatever it was. That was 7% of Facebook’s fully diluted market cap was spent on WhatsApp. These were brilliant acquisitions. Oculus. I mean Oculus hasn't turned out the same with what WhatsApp has perhaps, but like same idea. It's like this could be the new platform. If we don't buy this and Apple does we are subject to their random whims and fancies. So that's that's Category 1. Category 2 and this is super counterintuitive for a lot of companies. Buy the guys that failed trying because, they had the courage and the tenacity to try to go and build something new. And that's what you want in your company as well. And then this is the most counterintuitive part is like take the person that failed and put them in charge of the person that was successful.

FYI, if you'd like to directly listen to selective parts, you can go here. (I try to cut business/tech podcasts in my spare time and share it with friends.)
submitted by earlydayrunnershigh to fintech [link] [comments]


2019.02.23 04:08 MoonlightConcerto Your kiva recipients



Hi Everyone,

I thought it would be good for all my students to see what their initial contributions to their LOB (Law of Belief) courses has bought.

For those who don't know, I charge $100 upfront for LOB (law of belief) coaching, and $250 upon successful mission completion within 4 months, for a total of $350. No charges come into my personal pocket. They are made via direct donations to kiva.org, probably the world's largest microcredit lender that has received $1 billion in funding over 10+ years. Students purchase a Kiva gift card from Kiva directly and email the gift card to me. I apply that gift card to anyone listed on Kiva who strikes my fancy. That way, no monies pass through my hands.

I love Kiva because it supports people who are building a life and small business for themselves. They are thus able to put food on their family's table without depending on anyone else, and reduce the economic burden facing their country. Many of these businesses are recession-proof cottage industries - another great benefit. Even if they don't get rich in this lifetime, they will be able to educate their children and move their family 1-3 rungs up the economic ladder. And this charity donation does not disappear after one meal. It teaches a man to fish - or rather, helps him buy a fishing rod for himself when he already knows how to fish - and thus enables him to feed himself for the rest of his life.

The gift that keeps on giving. Kinda like mastering the LOB, wouldn't you say ? :)

Kiva thus functions like a commercial bank, with two big differences. The borrowers do not have any assets to pledge as collateral for loans. Second big difference ? Their default rates are lower than that of commercial banks.

Yes.

Here's an article about kiva :

https://www.forbes.com/sites/susanprice/2017/07/06/lending-pioneer-kiva-hits-the-one-billion-mark-and-launches-a-fund-for-refugees/#1bfc1e2d5dfe

And here's an article about the guy who started this whole microcredit movement off, and won a Nobel prize along the way :
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_Yunus

And here are the 11 people who my great gallant brave determined smart tough and absolutely brilliant students have funded through kiva :

1. Mary's story - Kenya

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1709375
Wonderful people of the globe, meet Mary, a single mother!
Mary is a rural farmer who lives in Molo. She was raised in challenging circumstances and her basic needs were never met, so she vowed she would turn her life around and live a comfortable life. This is why she started mixed farming, and she has been farming for more than ten years. Through dedication, hard work and commitment, she has been able to provide for the basic needs of her family.
Although she makes some profit, she faces the challenge of inadequate water for irrigating her crops and even for home consumption. Most of the rain water is wasted and Mary wants to harvest that water. For this reason she is kindly requesting a loan to buy a water tank. The Molo area has no piped water, and this means one has to travel long distances in search of “this precious commodity”.
With this loan, Mary will be able to store water for home consumption, and it will also help her to irrigate her crops. She awaits your kindness.

2. Zawadi's story - Kenya

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1693271
Zawadi is a married woman. She describes herself as honest. She operates a farm where she keeps cows. Her business is located in a good area and her primary customers are locals.
She describes her biggest business challenge to be inadequate working capital. She will use the 100,000 KES loan to buy animal feed and another dairy cow for milk production. This is her fifth loan with SMEP Microfinance Bank and her previous loans were successfully repaid.

3. Caleb's story - Kenya

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1705266
Caleb has 3 children and lives in the rural region of Belgut. His dream is to create a cost-effective, sustainable dairy farm to pass on to his children and even his future grandchildren.
Caleb is currently spending too much money on the propane required to heat the milk produced by his cows for pasteurization. With the Sistema Biobolsa biodigester, Caleb will reduce his reliance on expensive and non-renewable LP gas and agrochemical fertilizers by processing the manure from his 2 dairy cows to produce biogas and biofertilizer, helping both his wallet and the environment. This loan will help Caleb to install an 8-cubic-meter biodigester that will pay for itself after an average of two years.
The resulting reduction in operating costs will allow him to better deal with the fluctuating and unpredictable milk prices and make it easier for Caleb and his kids to continue the generations-old tradition of dairy farming in Belgut.
This loan represents 63% of the price of the biodigester; the remaining part is paid directly by Caleb.

4. Praxedes's story - The Philippines

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1702697
Praxedes works hard to support six children. She is married and has a raising pigs business in the Philippines.
Praxedes requested a loan in the amount of 5400 PHP through NWTF to buy a sanitary toilet.
She is getting the sanitary toilet, because she wants to give her family a clean and safe way of living.
Praxedes is aware that by using the sanitary toilet, she is not only saving money, she is also helping the environment and reducing health and hazard risks to her family.

5. Maria Marleny's story - Peru

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1685335
María is a 54-year-old mother who lives with her husband and their two children. They reside in a marginalized rural area in the District of Lancones in Piura Province. This community is located three hours away from the city of Chiclayo.
María earns her living by raising and selling animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, and guinea pigs. When the animals are well-developed, she offers them for sale to merchants who always visit the area where she lives. María wants to invest in the purchase of livestock in bulk and balanced feed. This will enable her to sell animals at a better price so that she can generate more income. In order to achieve this goal, she is requesting a loan from Edpyme Alternativa in the amount of 2,003 PEN.
María is an honest and hardworking woman who is dedicated to her family. Her greatest wish is for her family to have a better quality of life.

6. Mak Cing Farmers Group's story - Uganda

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1716913
Anjella is a female Ugandan aged 49 living in Ngwero, married with 3 children and 1 other dependant who all go to school.
She is a farmer growing cassava, maize, simsim, sunflower which she has been doing for the past 30 years. Besides farming, she sells silver fish and also does a local brew.
Anjella is requesting for a loan of 300,000 from VisionFund Uganda to buy seeds and also to prepare the garden for this season. The earnings will help her clear school fee balances and also enable her to save some money in their village savings box.
She is supported by her husband who also does farming.
Being hardworking, her pride and her dream is to have her children reach a higher level of education. She is thankful to Kiva for the support.
In this group: Anjella, Anjuleta, Agnes, Robinson, Hellen, Betty, Christine, Betty, Joseph, Jackson, Pamela, Stella, Molly, Agnes, Catherine and Mary.

7. Francisco's story - Timor-Leste

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1720096
Francisco has been involved in business activities for many years now. He has a livestock business (mainly goats), which he first started with his own working capital. Raising and selling animals like cows, goats and pigs is a very common activity in the zone because it is an easy way to earn money for the family.
Francisco has been making a living from it since he first started and it has been really helpful for his family's income as well.
He would like a loan of $700 through KIF to help him improve his business selling animals. He will use this loan to buy more young goats to raise and sell back at the local market when they are older.
As the result of the investment, he hopes to run a bigger business in the future. He would like to thank all the lenders for this opportunity.

8. Neivis's story - Columbia

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1716159
Neivis is 25 years old, does not have children, and her business is making crafts. She has tremendous skill and is an enterprising, hard-working and tenacious person. She has her business in the municipality of El Carmen De Bolívar.
Her business is successful because she has vast experience. The advantage of her business is that she has sales in bulk and strong seasons, the disadvantage is the lack of working materials.
Her dream is to improve her craft shop. She wants to purchase materials in bulk with the loan she is requesting from Corporación Interactuar. If you want to know more about the entrepreneurs and the loans from Interactuar, you can join the Lending Team called: “Friends of Interactuar Colombia”: http://www.kiva.org/team/interactuar_colombia."

9. Virginia De Mercedes's story - El Salvador

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1714335
Virginia studied up to the ninth grade in school, is single, and has two children. Her daughter is a teacher and lives with her and also her son-in-law and grandchildren. Her son is a driver and lives on his own.
Virginia has worked raising chickens for 7 years and learned it from one of her nephews. She cares for the animals at her house and then travels to other places to sell them. In addition, she is a farmer and previously sold clothing.
She needs the loan to purchase chickens and also concentrated feed to fatten them and sell them. In the past, she was supported by 2 loan and paid them off 100%.
Virginia dreams of getting ahead with raising the chickens and enjoying a better quality of life through her work.

10. Dora Alicia's story - Columbia

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1711934
Dora is 43 years old and lives in the municipality of Medellin. She’s a single mother who has three children, and they mean the world to her. Being a single mother has been challenging, but she has worked very hard to take care of her family. She has a little store, and she has become well-known in her region for being a humble and kind woman. She wants to do better so she can give a better future to her amazing family, so she’s asking for a loan to buy a cooler and more groceries to stock up.
Support this single mother and loan now.
If you want to know more about the entrepreneurs and the loans from Interactuar, you can join the Lending Team called: “Friends of Interactuar Colombia”: http://www.kiva.org/team/interactuar_colombia

11. Maria Lisbeth's story - Ecuador

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1715302
Crucita, a few minutes from the capital, is a small town of fishermen. The principal sources of income are small-scale and industrial fishing, and agriculture.
Maria is 27 years old. She is a single mother, with two children, ages 12 and 8, who attend school, and one 15 day-old baby. Maria and her mother have a chicken farm where they raise different varieties of chicken. They raise them for three or four months so that the chickens attain an adequate weight to be able to be sold. They have had this business for about seven years. They also clean fish on the beach and earn extra money to be able to cover household expenses.

12. Ma. Arlene's story - The Philippines

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1726408
Ma. Arlene is a married woman with three children. She is a very hard working entrepreneur.
Ma. Arlene has a buy and sell recyclable scrap materials business in the Philippines. Ma. Arlene requested a 13,000 PHP loan amount through NWTF to buy more recyclable scrap materials.
Ma. Arlene has been in this business for 6 years. In the future, Ma. Arlene would like to save money to expand her business.

13. Jean Baptiste's story

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1728620
Jean Baptiste, aged 35, is a married man. His wife works at selling secondhand clothing. Together, they have two children (both in school). For work, he raises pigs and has a year of experience in this business.
Currently he is on his second loan at CEFOR. Profitability depends on the size of his herd, hence this loan to purchase 4 more piglets. His goal is to build up more in savings and have more livestock.

14. Agnes' Group's story

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1723886

Agnes is 39 years old and is often referred to as a really friendly person. As a group leader, she is representing her group in Kakamega B (North) District, formed by 11 farmers, including herself.
Agnes has been a farmer for 15 years, and has worked with One Acre Fund for a while now, having joined for the first time in 2014 because she wanted to earn enough to feed her family. Not only will she get maize seeds and fertilizer with her loan, but also a solar light in order to reduce the consumption of paraffin fuel and therefore save more money. She decided that she will use the profits she gains from this year’s harvest to save more money for the future.
With this loan, Agnes’ Group will receive a total of 11 solar lights as well as farming inputs to plant a total of 0.25 acres.
In this group: Agnes, Sarah Nakhungu, Karakacha, Karakacha, Mourice, Vincent, Beatrice, Melisa, Moses, Peter, Raphael

15. Roziyakhon's story

https://www.kiva.org/lend/1739830

Roziyakhon lives in Rudaki, Tajikistan. She is an exceptional wife and mother with three children. She is a very educated, affable, and social woman.
Roziyakhon's husband migrated abroad to work. She herself has offered sewing services, making the national style of women's dresses, for the past five years. She loves her profession and is respected by her colleagues.
Roziyakhon wants to obtain an embroidery machine to expand her business. She is asking for a loan from Kiva’s partner IMON to achieve her goal.
She depends on you and thanks you in advance for the understanding.

Thank you guys !



moonbeam
https://www.reddit.com/JosephMurphy/
submitted by MoonlightConcerto to JosephMurphy [link] [comments]


2019.02.20 02:02 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip Mader The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
submitted by gnikivar2 to InternationalDev [link] [comments]


2019.02.20 01:48 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip MaderThe miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
submitted by gnikivar2 to bangladesh [link] [comments]


2019.02.20 01:47 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip MaderThe miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
submitted by gnikivar2 to IndiaSpeaks [link] [comments]


2019.02.20 01:38 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources:Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip MaderThe miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
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2019.02.20 01:24 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad Yunnus The Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez Miera In credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif Dowla Beyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World Bank Rise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip Mader The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
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2019.02.20 01:19 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip Mader The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
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2019.02.20 01:19 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip Mader The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
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2019.02.20 01:17 gnikivar2 Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be: Why Micro-Credit Brings Only Modest Returns

Everyday, Sufiya Begum, a 22-year old mother of 3, borrowed 22 cents from local moneylenders to buy bamboo with which she made furniture. All of her profits went back to those same moneylenders as she had to borrow at interest rates of 10% a day. Lack of access to capital and financial services has locked hundreds of millions of the most vulnerable in poverty. Many have touted microcredit as an intervention that can pull these people out of poverty, but it is unclear how effective it is in fighting poverty. Today's podcast will be exploring the effect of microcredit on global poverty, focusing on the success of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, the microcredit financial crisis of India, and an examination of the empirical evidence on microcredit.
Muhammad Yunnus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, began his career as banker to the poor in the village of Jobra, Bangadesh. He was inspired by the story of Sufiya Begum to make small loans to 42 women. To his surprise, all 42 women paid back their loans. Banks showed little interest in adopting Muhammad Yunus's idea, so in 1983 Muhammad Yunus created the Grameen Bank. The Grameen Bank's model centered on organizing groups of poor women. Each individual in a group is mandated to save small amounts of money everyday, and receives financial coaching from Grameen Bank employees. Average loans are small around $170, and generally intended for small business creation. While loans are made to individual members, liability for loans are share at the village level among groups of groups. The microlending relies upon social pressure by group members and the fact most members have few borrowing choices beyond microcredit to ensure extremely high levels of repayment, Microcredit has grown at a spectacular rate in Bangladesh. Approximately 25 million Bangladeshis, about one seventh of the population, borrow $5 billion from microredit financial institutes every year, and microcredit has been credited for one tenth of poverty reduction in rural Bangladesh.
The initial success of micro-credit in Bangladesh led to it's rapid expansion. However, as is the case in Andhra Pradesh, India, the result was overexpansion. Vikram Akula, a long time admirer of the Grameen Bank, founded SKS Microcredit in 1995, quickly turning it into one of the regions largest microcredit lenders. Akula argued that microcredit needed to attract private, profit seeking capital if it was to reach all of the poor. Vikram Akula worked to attract venture capitalists such as Seqouia Capital, the venture capital firm behind Google and Apple. The company's expansion accelerated in 2009, as the company moved towards an IPO. SKS added 100 branch banks, trained 1,000 workers and added 400,000 borrowers in just work. Loan officers were given incentives such as expensive watches and cash bonuses for signing up as many people as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly the quality of loans dropped rapidly, and SKS loan officers had to resort to drastic tactics to coerce repayments. SKS officers threatened borrowers with violence. Scores of suicides by desperate borrowers have been documented. The public turned against SKS bank, and it's employees were attacked if they attempted to collect loans. Eventually, the government of Andhra Pradesh stepped in, dramatically increasing regulations on microcredit and effectively shutting the for profit microcredit industry down.
Given Bangladesh and Andhra Pradesh's opposite experiences with microcredit, it is incredibly difficult to say if microcredit has a positive impact on fighting poverty. The original research on microcredit was highly promising. Studies consistently found large positive impacts on income, especially for poor women. However, these studies were observational rather than experimental. While economists try to control for education, income and other observable variables in their analyses, it is impossible to control for everything. As a result, developmental economics is coming to use experimental methods such as randomized control trials to understand what works. In 2005, researchers created a microcredit experiment in Hyderabad. They partnered with a local microcredit lender to open branches in 52 neighborhoods, and selected 52 other neighborhoods to act as a control and collected a series of survey over the next three years. The researchers found that although households in neighborhoods with a new microcredit branch borrowed substantially more and invested more in small businesses than control neighborhoods, the impact on poverty were modest. RCTs in Ethiopia , Bosnia ,Morocco and other places have consistently found disappointing results.
The best empirical evidence suggests that microcredit does not live up to the high hopes of the Grameen Bank, nor does it usually result in impoverishment as among many who borrowed from SKS Bank. It is instead a tool in the fight against global poverty that is useful in some circumstances. The development experience with micro-credit makes it clear that we can only identify the most effective anti-poverty strategies with rigorous analysis.
Selected Sources: Grameen Bank, Microcredit and Millennium Development Goals, Muhammad YunnusThe Creditworthiness of the Poor: A Model of the Grameen Bank , Michal Kowalik, David Martinez MieraIn credit we trust: Building social capital by Grameen Bank in Bangladesh, Asif DowlaBeyond Ending Poverty : The Dynamics of Microfinance in Bangladesh, World BankRise and Fall of Microfinance in India: The Andhra Pradesh Crisis in Perspective, Phillip Mader The miracle of microfinance? Evidence from a randomized evaluation , Abhijit Bannerjee, Esther Duflo
www.wealthofnationspodcast.com
http://media.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/s/content.blubrry.com/wealthofnationspodcast/India_Bangladesh-MicroCredit.mp3
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2018.11.25 16:33 reverthelp EXISTENCE AND ONENESS OF GOD ALMIGHTY : The names of God

Since the time of the Last Messenger, upon him be peace and blessings, the All-Beautiful Names of God, exalted is His Majesty, have been a right-guiding source for knowing and recognizing the Divine Being in accordance with His Attributes of Majesty and Grace, and for protecting those who have been able to study and understand them correctly from straying, and for pouring forth true knowledge about the truth of Divinity to those who have been so protected.
Everyone who has set off to acquire true knowledge of God has advanced toward deepening in belief in the bright light of the All-Beautiful Names and in their areas of manifestation. In pursuit of true knowledge and love of God Almighty and in pursuit of spiritual pleasures, they have given these Names into the hands of their outer and inner faculties, like so many mysterious keys that will open the doors of knowing Him in accordance with His “true Nature or Identity;” thus they have advanced toward the horizon of “seeing,” knowing, and experiencing Him in the light of the truth that radiates through these doors.
Even if from the earliest days of Islam the All-Beautiful Names have always been a pure source for those who want to have recourse to them for knowledge of God, they began to be studied and discussed systematically in later eras.
So many books, brief or detailed, in prose or in verse, have been written about the All-Beautiful Names of God that it is not possible to determine them or to mention all of them. My following citations are only a drop in the ocean:
Among the All-Beautiful Names, those such as al-Quddus (The All-Holy and All-Pure), as-Salam (The Supreme Author of peace and salvation), al-Ahad(The Unique One of absolute Oneness), and al-Wahid (The One of absolute Unity) mark, like the Attributes of Exemption, the all-holiness, all-purity, and absolute uniqueness of the Divine Being.
The all-glorious Names al-Hayy (the All-Living), al-‘Alim (the All-Knowing), as-Sami‘ (the All Hearing), al-Basir (the All-Seeing), al-Murid (the All-Willing), al Qadir (the All-Powerful), and al-Mutakallim (the All-Speaking) appear as translators of the Positive or Affirmative Attributes; the all sacred Names, such as al-Khaliq(the Creator), al-Mubdi (the All Initiating), al-Muhyi (the All-Reviving, the Giver of life), al-Mumit (The One Who causes to die), ar-Razzaq(the All-Providing), al Wahhab (the All-Bestowing), al-Ghaffar (the All-Forgiving), as Sattar (the All-Veiling), al-Bari (the All-Holy Creator), and al-Mu sawwir (the All-Fashioning) are indicative of the manifestations of the Attribute of Making Exist on different wavelengths.
Whatever truth of the Divine Essence the Names reflect and whatever Attribute they translate, all of the All-Beautiful Names of God are expressive of a different beauty, sacredness, sanctity, and perfection in the name of that All-Transcending Being. Whenever they are mentioned, they mark the limits of the truths for belief with their meanings, contents, and luminosity, they arouse respect in believing spirits, and cause the hearts that beat with respect to turn to God once again, more deeply.
Every blessed Name Which is mentioned in awareness in the depths of one’s conscience removes the filth, soot, and rust from eyes and hearts, rips up the veils of corporeality, and shows spirits to the realms beyond and what lies further beyond. They remind us of the All-Sacred One to Whom they refer, as if they were our intercessors with Him; as long as people remember and mention God with these Names, hearts find contentment and rest.
Furthermore, according to the rule, “The value of the knowledge is proportionate to what is known,” those who know these blessed Names with respect to the Divine Being and attain certain degrees of profundity through them are greatly valued by the inhabitants of the heavens and included in the candidates for the Divine Presence. If being a candidate for the Di- vine Presence depends on true knowledge of Him, then that All Majestic, All-Exalted Being can only be known with His Attributes of Majesty and Grace in the luminous atmosphere of these Names. We know things only according to the limited extent of our sensations of their corporeal beings, and judge them accordingly.
But true knowledge about God Almighty with His all-transcending Existence can only be acquired by knowing the totality of all of His All-Beautiful Names; He can be known only beyond all modalities of quality and quantity. This reality also indicates that He is a Necessarily Existent Being Whose Existence is by Himself. This is what all Muslims believe.
Some scholars of Sufism and the Islamic creed have regarded the All-Beautiful Names as the foundation of the truths of the universe, things, and humanity.
They have made a highly different in- terpretation of these Names, saying: “The truths of things consist in the Divine Names.”
According to them, all things, as well as all the willful and “instinctive”acts of human beings and other beings—without ignoring the role of the free will in the acts of human beings—are only mirrors that reflect the manifestations of the Divine Names. Bodies are only assemblages of material particles and compounds, while the Divine Names are in effect the spirits that reside in them.
As for the true nature of these manifestations and the All-Majestic, All-Exalted Divine Being Himself, before Whom the Names are veils, we should act in self-possession and remain in wonder, saying like the scholars of the Ahlu’s-Sunna:
“God is completely different from whatever comes to your mind concerning Him,”
or in the words of Imam ar-Rabbani:
“God is beyond and further beyond whatever comes to your mind concerning Him.”
Even though certain impulses that arise from feelings or fanciful attitudes, or, in the words of Imam al-Ghazzali, “the worldly reason or intellect” cloud our atmosphere of spirit and heart, we should try to remain within the limits of our creed, saying like Ziya Pasha:
“Perception of such transcendent matters is not something for our incapable reason / For these scales cannot measure such a great load.”
If God Almighty had not introduced Himself to us with His All-Beautiful Names, we would never be able to comprehend the truth concerning these Names in what is going on in the universe or to know the All-Sacred Being Who is called by them. It is only through His making His Being, His Essential Characteristics, and His Attributes of Glory known that we are able to have knowledge of the truths that we know today, even though this is incomplete. It is our belief that the Names in question are the titles of His Being; as a result we try to acquire bits of knowledge about the truth of Divinity, voicing our requests at His door, which is open to all, and constantly observe these Names in hopeful expectation that our requests will certainly be answered, provided we submit to His judgments and commands. We believe that we can overcome our various troubles and ailments and be saved from our centuries-old problems by turning to Him, using these Names, each of Which has the effect of a different mysterious medication, as intercessors with Him.
We approach the All-Beautiful Names and understand them in accordance with whatever meaning they have in God’s sight and in the way the master of creation, upon him be the most perfect of blessings and peace, perceived and interpreted them. We regard opposing considerations as deviance in thought and belief. How can we think and act otherwise when the Qur’an tells us that the denial of the Names, whether explicitly or by way of misguided interpretations, or the attribution of them, with their meanings and contents that are unique to God, to others than God is heresy? Declaring,
God—there is no deity save Him; His are the All-Beautiful Names (20:8),
the Qur’an refers the whole of existence, including human kind and the universe with whatever occurs in it, to those All-Beautiful Names.
It is of great importance that every responsible person has recourse to the Divine Names so that they can have accurate knowledge of God and entreat Him properly and be able to establish a proper relationship with their Creator. We begin every good deed with His Names, and render every act of service under their supervision. We believe that any work done without having recourse to these will be fruitless. The Names Allah (God) and ar-Rahman (the All-Merciful) are of particular importance and have a special place in the Divine Being’s sight. They are the first door through which we enter the clime of prayers and entreaties.
Even though some philosophers and the theologians influenced by them have put forward certain differing views about the All-Beautiful Names, as they have done for the Attributes, the scholars of the Ahlu’s-Sunna have always acted with care, sensitivity, and self-possession. Without going into detail or useless interpretations, they have maintained that the Names can be identical to or separate from the Divine Essence. It has sometimes happened that they have asserted in a moderate style that the Names are neither identical to nor separate from the Divine Essence, thus preferring to distance themselves from further discussion.
Some others among the Sufis have opined that the All-Beautiful Names, Which we know and recite, are in fact the titles of the real Names, while the truth of Names lies beyond them. They have approached the matter of the Names, saying like Yunus Emre:
“There is Süleyman within Süleyman,”
and asserted that there is a relation between the Names we know and the real Divine Names that are behind existence which is similar to the relation between the corporeal heart and the spiritual heart and that which exists between the spirit and the body. They have stressed that the real Names can only be realized through a profound spiritual experience and the ecstasy of feeling God’s holy Presence.
No matter what their true nature is, the All-Beautiful Names Which God Almighty has taught us in His manifest Book are each a mysterious key for a certain sort of relationship with Him in the heart and the spirit; through these we can traverse our distance from Him, advancing toward nearness to Him, something that we are aware of in our conscience.
Those who reach this horizon work for God’s sake, begin every task for God’s sake, and do whatever they do for God’s sake; in the words of Bediüzzaman,
they can make the seconds of their life as fruitful as the years of other people by moving and stopping “for God,” “for God’s sake,” and “for the good pleasure of God.”
Why should this not be possible, as the servants are His servants, the Names are His Names, it is He Who is called by these Names, and the door to which the servants turn is His door?
Some scholars have asserted that God’s Names are only those Which God and His Messenger have taught us as Divine Names, and it is not acceptable to derive Names from certain Divine Acts or to attribute them to God as being among His All-Beautiful Names. However, it is a fact that many Divine Acts are mentioned in the Qur’an in a way that will lead to different Names.
Moreover, God Almighty has not taught us all of His Names. As our master, upon him be peace and blessings, stated in his prayer that begins with,
“O God, I am Your servant, and the son of Your male servant, and the son of Your female servant,”
in addition to the All-Beautiful Names Which are mentioned in the Qur’an and certain Prophetic sayings, God has Names Which He mentioned in the previous Divine Books or Which He particularly informed some of His servants about or Which He keeps concealed with Him.
However, we cannot know any of His Names unless He teaches them to us. We can know only the Names Which He has taught us either in the Qur’an or in the Sunna.
Abu Hurayra, may God be pleased with him, narrates 99 Divine Names from the noblest Prophet, upon him be peace and blessings.
Even though these same Names are narrated from the Prophet by Salmanu’l-Farisi, ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Abbas, ‘Abdul lah ibn ‘Umar, and Caliph ‘Ali, may God be pleased with them, these narrations have not been authenticated. Some assert that the number 99 was used as a symbol of multiplicity in the hadith related by Abu Hurayra, therefore we cannot say that God’s All-Beautiful Names are restricted to 99.
God is the Creator of everything, and therefore believers must mention Him as the Creator and avoid making specifications, such as the Creator of snakes or the Creator of vermin.
However, we must also avoid going to the opposite extreme while taking care that anything improper for God should not be attributed to Him, and must not claim, like the Mu‘talizis, that human beings are the creators of their deeds and God does not create evil or ugly things or events.
For it is He Who creates both good and evil, and a thing or event is evil not with respect to its creation but with respect to its doer and cause.
This attitude is required by both the necessity of considering God’s Attributes correctly and observing the decrees and effects of Divine Essential Characteristics, Attributes, and All-Beautiful Names.
God is both the One of absolute grandeur and glory and the All-Merciful and All-Compassionate; He is both the All-Overwhelming and the All-Wise, both the One Severe in Punishment and the All-Patient (Whom no haste induces to rush into an action). He is both the All-Majestic and the All Gracious, and the All-Just and the All-Clement. We must always view Him in the light of the general meaning and content that is formed by the totality of His Attributes and Names.
The acts and designations attributed to God or mentioned in connection with Him must be considered from the perspective of His absolute Sacredness and Purity and His absolute exemption from any defect or resemblance to the created.
For example, concepts such as making schemes, plotting, mocking, disgracing, or the like must be viewed and used in a style proper for the truth of Divinity and the essential characteristic of Divine Lordship. This is because respect for the Names and observing a style that is in keeping with God’s absolute exemption from any defect or resemblance means being respectful for the All-Sacred One Who is called by these Names.
Not only should the All-Beautiful Names be considered with appreciation and without imputing any faults or defects to them, also the Divine acts and all works or creatures of the Lord, which are mirrors, results, and the arena of the manifestations of these Names, must be treated the same on account of their being indicators or witnesses of God Almighty.
Those who right fully approach the matter from this perspective remind us of an important point:
we must always be appreciative of Divine Acts, hold the Divine Names as being absolutely free from any defect, and exalt the All-Sacred Divine Being.
With respect to the level of existence of everything and as it is something that has been created, every being, every object speaks of Him in its own peculiar language and style.
All creatures say in unison:
Our words differ, but Your Beauty is one; all of them indicate that All-Beautiful “Face.”
If a person can look at existence with their conscience and lend an ear to the messages of events, they will discern the reality expressed by Hodja Tahsin:
Contemplate the lines of the universe, for they are missives to you from the Highest Realm.
How can this reality not be discerned seeing that His Being is, in one sense, announced through the lines of the universe, and His Knowledge, Life, Power, and Will are voiced through them, that the manifestations of His Names of Glory are known through them on different wavelengths, and everything gives us great joy and happiness through the most delicate embroideries of the subtlest art, order and harmony they display?
I should point out once more that even though the most accurately narrated Tradition concerning the All-Beautiful Names is the one reported by Abu Hurayra, may God be pleased with him, according to the majority of scholars the Divine Names are not restricted to those mentioned in this Tradition. On the contrary, there are many other Divine Names that are mentioned in both the Qur’an and the Sunna, both explicitly and by allusion.
The 99 blessed Names mentioned in the Tradition in question may have special importance in respect of prayers, entreaties, supplications, and particular instances of turning to God Almighty.
For as mentioned above, there are other Names that certain other people have been informed of but Which have not been disclosed to everyone.
The number of the Names Which are mentioned in the Qur’an and the books of the accurately related Prophetic Traditions in the forms of nouns, adjectives, and verbal nouns is as much as 550, and even reaches 1,000 in the Traditions related by members of the Prophet’s Family.
In some cultures, God Almighty is mentioned with the names or titles Which are not opposed to the Qur’anic concept of the Divine Being such as the One having no beginning, the Eternal in the past, the Eternal in the future, the Perpetual, the Everlasting, the Necessarily Existent Being, the Ever-Turner of hearts or the Ever Disposer of hearts.
“Huda” in Persian can be viewed as being a name in the same strain. However, the promise for entering Paradise in return for consideration of God’s Names seems to relate to the Tradition reported by Abu Hurayra. That is, it was promised that one would enter Paradise if they considered God’s Names that were mentioned in the Prophetic Tradition reported by Abu Hurayra. We refer the truth of the matter to God Almighty; we turn to the scholars of Hadith for what is meant by consideration.
They understand from this the regular, heart-felt recitation of those Names and the illumination of one’s inner world through them, as well as being respectful for the concept of the Divine Being that arises from their totality, following the principles of good conduct they provide, and trying to be aware of the mysteries of Divinity expressed by them.
All of the All-Beautiful Names are absolutely sacred.
Some have regarded it impermissible to use some of these Names for others than God.
These are Names like Allah (God), ar-Rahman (the All-Merciful), al-Quddus (The All-Holy and All-Pure), al Muhyi, (The Giver of life and All-Reviving), al-Mumit (The One Who causes to die), Maliku’l-Mulk(The Absolute Master of all dominion), Dhu’l-Jalali wa’l-Ikram (The One of Majesty and Grace), al-Akbar (The All-Great, the Greatest of all), al-‘A’la (The All-Exalted), al-Khaliq (The Creator),‘Allamu’l-Ghuyub (The All Knowing of the whole of the Unseen), and so on.
This knowledge of the Divine Names and this approach to both the Divine Names and the truths of Divinity are unique to the Muslim Community.
In fact, God’s Essential, Affirmative, and Figurative Attributes and His Attributes of Exemption confirm this truth and call us to this accurate approach.
For this reason, in addition to knowing Him as the All-Knowing, the All-Living, the All-Powerful, the All-Hearing, the All-Seeing, the All-Willing, and the All Speaking, based on their Affirmative Attributes, we must also affirm His absolute freedom from whatever is inappropriate for Divinity such as impotence, poverty, neediness, defects, and having partners.
Furthermore, we must in no way attribute any features that are peculiar to the created to God, such as being concerned with matter, time, space, physicality, or energy. We must believe that, in the words of Ibrahim Haqqi ,
God is an All Majestic, All-Exalted Being Who never eats or drinks, and Who is absolutely beyond time and space.
As will be mentioned below, some verifying scholars have divided the Divine Names into the categories such as the Names indicating the Divine Essence, the Names originating in the Affirmative Divine Attributes, and the Names indicating the Divine Acts.
They have also regarded some Names as being the leaders or foundations of all the Names, and have made another categorization under the titles of the Names of Majesty and the Names of Grace. They have considered all the Names to be the foundation or source in which the truths of things originate or even these truths themselves, as well as being the means of all things being transferred from the Realm of the Unseen to the visible or manifest world through the Divine Knowledge, Wisdom, Will, and Power.
Such scholars have stressed that these all-blessed Names are veils before the All-Sacred One Who is called by them.
It is He alone Who knows the exact truth of everything, and what we must do is to believe in whatever He teaches us.
It is unnecessary to make a detailed explanation of the All-Beautiful Names here as there are numerous studies that have been made so to date—a few of these were mentioned at the beginning of this article. You will find below the most widely known Divine Names only with just brief definitions.
O God! Show us the truth as being true and enable us to follow it; show us falsehood as being false and enable us to refrain from it. And bestow blessings and peace on our master Muhammad and on his Family and Companions, all of them.
submitted by reverthelp to RevertHelp [link] [comments]


2018.11.11 19:55 Aslan27 [Day After] - Post-Match Thread - Galatasaray 3-0 Kayserispor

Seen the idea on /soccer and think it would be nice to discuss performances of individuals with video highlights, what stood out to you, etc. Also nice for those who didn't get to see the game live and watched a replay later like I do sometimes because of work or whatever it may be.
1. Goals
2. Formation
With quite a few injuries and suspended players, FT and the team decided to field a 3-5-2 formation - Ozan/Maicon/Serdar as our CB's, Mariano and Omer as wing-backs, Selcuk lying deep in the midfield with Feghouli and Belhanda in front, and Onyekuru with Sinan up top as our "strikers"
3. Key Player video highlights
  • Feghouli(video) - he gave a lot of us fans a feeling of his revival - although too early to draw a conclusion, he played great. His awareness of the playing field, his runs, passes (both short and long) were all on point. If this means the beginning of a good run, I'm very optimistic for what he shows in the upcoming games. His pairing with Belhanda was also really great. Both players actually have high football knowledge and worked well together.
  • Belhanda(video) - as much as some of us criticize his temper, stupid impulsive reactions, and lazy/give-up moments, he's still one of the best players we have going forward. He is no Sneijder or prime Xelcuk, but he is good and showed us that again today.
  • Onyekuru(video) - two goals, what more is there to say? He was hustling all.game.long. He is hungry and clearly wants to improve and get better. Unfortunately this can't be said about his strike partner, Sinan. Onyekuru was making a lot of runs, hustling back to receive and release the ball. He runs to put pressure on the last defenders when they have the ball, what us fans want to see our strikers do (Think Burak Yilmaz, Umut Bulut, and Gomis at times). If Onyekuru has a solid striker next to him like Gomis or Drogba, we'd be banging in a lot of goals. I wonder if we'll give him and Eren a try together when Eren returns. But this Sinan obsession by our coaching staff is awfully irritating.
  • Yunus Akgun(video) - only played 10 minutes but damn I love this kids style of play. Reminds me of Messi/Emre Mor in that he sees open spaces and just runs right through with the ball not leaving his feet. Incredibly talented dribbler and has a very forward-minded style. I know some of you criticized him before for being a little lazy and not tracking back, but I say that's okay. Not all attacking players have to come back and help defensively. Plus he can learn this as he gets older and more aware. Let him stay up there and be our first or second option to give the ball to and then the rest of the team supports.
  • Celil Yuksel(video) - someone said it nice in the match/post thread, "Yerli Verratti" - both standing at a whopping 5 foot 5 inches. Yes I agree his height is a disadvantage but it's not like he is skinny and fragile. He's got a little bit of meat/muscle to him. If he can keep working at that, the only thing that matters next is how he distributes the ball and his positioning. He didn't do much in the 10 or so minutes he played but we need to see more to really judge. With all our midfield injuries, I think we'll get just that. Hope he uses his time well.
  • Ozan Kabak(video) - believe we never saw Ozan play in this rotation, alongside two other CB's. He actually impressed me quite a bit playing on the side. Reminded me of Hakan Balta with how he handled many situations close to the touch-line. He did get beat by Bilal pretty bad early in the game (see video), otherwise he was cool-headed and made proper passes down the side and through the middle. Guys, I really think this kid is going to be special. He went from being young and impressive, to young, impressive, and consistent.
4. Extras
  • I found interesting that we only sent Celil to Bein for a pre-match interview. After the game Umit Davala's analysis was literally 20 something seconds and very simple. We got points we deserved, mention of Ataturk, and that's it. Very quiet, simple, not responsive to what journalists might want to ask in addition. I can see this being a common occurrence for the next few weeks after all the cezas.
  • Kayseri aren't in the best state and we shouldn't get too excited about the victory, but still, we won 3-0 with a lot of missing players, we won away, and we played convincingly.
  • We're now off for 2 weeks with the international break. It will serve us (hopefully) well - players coming back from injury, getting rest, and the team figuring out plan of action/tactics for when we return.
  • This win was very, very important. We haven't had the best luck and run of games recently. I firmly believe once our players come back from ceza/injury, and the pick-up of a solid striker next transfer window, or even another CB, we'll be in great shape. We still have 6 more league, 2 more CL games until then. Really need to push and approach it game by game
  • As u/WhiteGhosts/ mentioned in the comments, Mariano also played amazing. It's true he hasn't been his former self with his touches lately, but his creativity and ability to find through balls is still there. Displayed clearly in the 1st and 3rd goal
I may have missed somethings so feel free to add or just follow-on with what I wrote. It did take some time to write this up and I'm just one voice so things may be wrong or whatever. I'd like to do this after every game but only if there is genuine interest otherwise I probably won't.
Edit: Added Ozan's performance clip
submitted by Aslan27 to galatasaray [link] [comments]


2018.10.04 12:47 TolarHashNET Tolar — September Retrospective

Tolar — September Retrospective
Here is our brief for the month of September.
September 1: Tadej Slapnik joins Tolar HashNET team
Tadej Slapnik, former State Secretary in Office of the Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia, has joined our team as the Director of Tolar HashNET Slovenia. Read all about his experience and work here.
https://preview.redd.it/0yet1f8xd5q11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=e5ebe99b5042e589f059c066394f99db0c390cf6

September 3: Interview with Decentral Magazine
Our CIO, Mario Vojvoda, answered questions about our technology for the Decentral Magazine. The article written by Nini Moru can be found here.

September 4: Tadej Slapnik participated at the OECD Blockchain Policy Forum in Paris.
Tadej Slapnik, participated at the high-level Panel: Blockchain for Better Policies, OECD Blockchain Policy Forum in Paris, together with Mrs. Ana Brnabić, Prime Minister of Serbia, Mr. David Burt, Premier of Bermuda, Mr. Pravind Kumar Jugnauth, Prime Minister, Republic of Mauritius and Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General at OECD. Read more.
https://preview.redd.it/fu2rzol1e5q11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=fc93e516ee2e3d3ae1d1741e6e87a2e1c3bb9720

September 4: Tolar HashNET and Unibright become partners
Tolar HashNET and Unibright signed a Memorandum of Understading (MoU) to support further expansion and worldwide adoption of Unibright’s framework and Tolar HashNET. Learn all about the partnership.
https://preview.redd.it/d0ohh0e4e5q11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f105a2ecdc844a40cf33f267a53f9e0595871b78

September 12: Tolar Prototype Presentation
We have held yet another presentation of our prototype, where we have demonstrated the maximum speed of 154,000 TPS on 100 nodes. Make sure to watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1130&v=Yn376TT6XCM

September 13: AMA with ICO gens
Watch the AMA now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--mUz5cyF9o

September 17: Tadej Slapnik met with members of European Parliament delegation in Taipei
Tadej Slapnik, Tolar HashNET Slovenia Director, joined members of European Parliament delegation in Taipei and discussed potential of European — Taiwan cooperation in the field of Circular Economy, Blockchain Technology and Social Economy. Read the full story here.
https://preview.redd.it/du5hmvnhe5q11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=48ad58af4f56003c07a08367247db9b6ec05d30b

September 18: Review by Suppoman
Make sure to watch @MichaelSuppo’s video on could Tolar do well in a bear market and why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVOZLAlwe5A

September 19: Interview with the Crypto Lifestyle
Check out the live interview with the Crypto Lifestyle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iS1wGWkz3rc

September 20: Tolar HashNET ICO is completed
Thanks to all of our investors and the community for the amazing support that we have received throughout this journey. This is only the beginning. Ahead of us is another journey full of good news, partnerships, conferences and most importantly, HashNET development.
Total amount raised in presale and ICO: 28,807.01 ETH. Unsold tokens will be burned.

September 25: Tadej Slapnik participates as a speaker at UNGA in NYC
Tadej Slapnik participated as a speaker at at the 73rd United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) High-Level Side Event on Social Business, Youth and Technology, chaired by Nobel prize literate and SDG Advocate prof. Muhamad Yunus. The event was held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.
Watch Tadej Slapnik’s speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=0e5Msqxf43E
He also had a fruitful discussion about potentials of Blockchain technology for achieving Sustainable Development Goals with members of the 73th UNGA, Chinese Youth Delegation at Permanent Mission of the Republic of Slovenia to the United Nations in New York.
https://preview.redd.it/h8oy6710f5q11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3149fe20a5bc4bbdda3bb1f61631d73f7fa0dac1

September 30: Tolar token release
Token distribution process has started on September 30, 2018 at 2:00 pm GMT**.** All investors have received their TOL tokens by end of day. Further purchase of TolarZ became available after Tolar was listed on exchange. More info on the distribution process is here.

September 30: Tolar token (TOL) is listed on Hotbit
We are excited to announce that Tolar token (TOL) will be listed on Hotbit starting from September 30, 2018. If you were not able to participate in the ICO phase, you will now be able to buy TOL on Hotbit. More info.
Thank you again for the amazing support so far and we will do our best to deliver more good news to the Tolar community.
submitted by TolarHashNET to u/TolarHashNET [link] [comments]